Buch am Bord or Additional Free Baggage Allowance for Bookworms


Condor Airlines, the Thomas Cook company, is now giving its German passengers a one kilo allowance extra for their reading materials. This is a great idea. It means the passengers can take along a few hefty books and not have them count as part of their luggage allowance. All passengers have to do is buy a book from a bookshop in the scheme and get their sticker.

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Source: condor.com

I think ALL airlines should adopt such as scheme. I recently travelled Wizz Air and used the Priority Booking system in order to take my laptop on-board as an extra item. In addition, I noted I could also take some reading materials. This is great. Wizz Air are as bad as Ryan Air used to be in weighing and measuring wheelie suitcases, so the fact that you can carry a book or newspaper as an extra can only be a good thing.

Budget Airlines and booksellers should get together to promote such as scheme. I think holidays are a great time to catch up on reading especially as passengers spend a lot of time hanging around airports and sitting in planes. If passengers take printed books they do not necessarily have to bring them back. A bit like bookcrossing this could encourage sharing and reading – passengers could leave their finished books in airport lounges, cafes, hotels etc. What a great boost to reading.

 

Image source: https://www.condor.com/de/entdecken/aktionen-specials/buch-an-bord-aktion.jsp

Writer’s dilemma: laptop or notepad


electronics

Samsung Galaxy Note 10 challenge – taking notes on the road

When I was planning my recent research trip to the Czech Republic and Poland, I thought long and hard about how I was going to take notes on the trip, how I was going to store up any ideas and information and how I might actually revise the manuscript on the move. Having keyed in about 20,000 words, I thought a print out would be too heavy and bulky to take on the trip, especially since I was travelling by budget airline.I considered a proper notebook but that hadn’t worked well for me the previous year because I keep scratching things out and altering them. The result was a proper mess I could barely make head or tail of. I had not wanted to cart around the huge laptop because of the luggage requirements which is why I decided to invest in a tablet.

I equipped myself with a reconditioned Samsung Galaxy Note 10, set it up and downloaded a third party App to enable me to use my Apple keyboard. I did a dummy run with the pen and managed, with some difficulty, to get the machine to recognize my handwriting. I have long been aware that my handwriting is an issue for people being a mix of Central European 7s and Ts with old school penmanship. People not familiar with how things are written to the east of France appear to have some issues with it. Nevertheless, I thought the Samsung seemed to be coping.

With priority booking on Wizz Air passengers are allowed an extra small bag for camera or laptop and so on. I purchased a small carry bag just bigger that the Galaxy Note and packed it up.

As a back up, and because I like to read books on the Kindle App, I also packed my iPad Mini. This was fortuitous as once abroad the Galaxy Note decided it would no longer recognize either my writing or keypad. It also took issue with downloading my MS Word manuscript from my Cloud Drive. This was frustrating. After a wasted evening I put the Galaxy Note back in it’s carry bag where it remained until we returned home.

The solution? I received quite a few odd looks as I stood in the middle of Český Těšín bus station dictating the scene and notes into my LG Sprite phone. This method I supplemented with taking notes in a small notebook I had packed. It seemed to work.

The idea had been to have one tablet PC to do everything: take notes on the move using the pen, type up notes in cafes or on trains, make adjustments to the manuscript whilst in situ, use the on-board camera to take photos and videos to combine with the words and generally to reduce baggage and confusion. The Galaxy Note did not do it for me :(.

What have I learnt from this challenge? What can others learn from this challenge?

In the absence of any other solution (I think the Note was the third tablet I tried), I measured up my ASUS 15.5 inch laptop and discovered fits into a nice backpack along with its charger, mouse and IKEA riser. Therefore, it will go on future trips. The “smartish” phone came into it’s own as I was able to make recordings on it as I walked along the streets and even interrupt the recordings to add a snapshot of the scene. How good is that? Now, I have the updated Kindle App with white pages and everything on my iPad mini I don’t really need the old Kindle. I still bought another new notebook in Prague in the hope that I will one day fill it with thoughts. All the other stuff, I stuck into a small exercise book using glue tape I found in a small shop en route.

The Galaxy Note failed me and I am gutted. I had such high hopes for it. I hope it’s new owner has a better experience :).

Lynn